Autism Awareness Fun Day

I was invited along to show people the Band-it prototypes at the local Autism Awareness Fun Day, held at the Dracaena Centre in Falmouth. 

It is quite common for people with various learning difficulties to also have some level of sight loss. According to the RNIB,

Vision problems are, in fact, surprisingly common among people with learning disabilities. Of the 1.5 million people in the UK who are known to have a learning disability, at least one in 10 has significant sight loss. This is particularly the case for people who are more profoundly disabled. Six in 10 people with learning disabilities need glasses and though this sight loss is less serious, they may not have glasses and/or the support to get used to them.

http://goo.gl/ZtY8Cs

This was, therefore, a good opportunity to meet different people with special needs and those involved in working with them. Whilst at the Fun Day I spoke to many people and asked them how they could see Band-it being used, not just for people with visual impairment but others as well. 

Here are some of the responses I had:

Paper reading: Dementia care in care homes. Patients given a shape to identify their room door.

Paper read: Fiddle toys. Sensory marker on wrists as an identifier.

Paper reads: When I was suffering with panic attacks I used to wear hairbands on my wrists. I feel these are more jazzy.

Paper reads: Ingenious and very useable invention...as an ex-nurse I can see how valuable this product could be both in the workplace and in the home as a tactile aid and also to grip various household items -  a multitude of uses for many vulnerable people and also children.

[Pictures show paper with handwriting on, which reads: 1 Ingenious and very useable invention...as an ex-nurse I can see how valuable this product could be both in the workplace and in the home as a tactile aid and also to grip various household items -  a multitude of uses for many vulnerable people and also children. 2 Dementia care in care homes. Patients are given a shape to identify their room door. 3 Fiddle Toys. Sensory marker on wrists as an identifier. 4 When I was suffering from panic attacks I used a hair bobble on my wrist. I feel these bands are more jazzy.]

 

I find it really interesting hearing how else people can see these products being used, so if you have any other ideas of how Band-it could be used, please email me at hannah@bandituk.com or tweet @banditproducts.